2 results for month: 02/2020


The Importance of Volunteers to our Wildlife Conservation Mission

One of Science for Wildlife’s core values is Collaboration. We value the involvement of others as it ensures we deliver the highest quality conservation outcomes, enables us to connect communities to wildlife, helps build stewardship for conservation in the local community and also allows us to apply our research to on-ground conservation action. Without our volunteers, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible at all. Who are our volunteers and what role do they play? Our volunteers come from a variety of different community contexts including environmental and community groups, bushwalking ...

Using Satellite Imagery to effectively Deploy Critical Resources

In the wake of the bushfire disaster, there has been an urgent need to get water and food to native wildlife. However, it’s not easy to make sure supplies are going where they are most needed. By using the latest satellite imagery technology, the Science for Wildlife team are assessing where and when wildlife are in need of food and water supplies, so we can send our amazing team of volunteers into targeted areas. The impact of recent rainfall Recent rainfall, which extinguished some of the most persistent bush fires we have seen this season, came as a huge relief to many across the state. The Science for Wildlife Research and Volunteer teams were ...