Our Most Enthusiastic Team Member – Groot the Detection Dog!

Our youngest and most energetic team member Groot has been hard at work training to become a wildlife detection dog in the Science for Wildlife team. Groot will assist us in locating and tracking native wildlife by smelling and recognising their scat. Groot is our third generation of wildlife detection dogs within the S4W team, following on from the great work of our previous team member Badger, and our current detection dog Smudge. The use of detection dogs to identify scat is relatively new to Australia and is an incredibly effective method of tracking wildlife. A ...

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Bushwalking, Canyoning and Exploring – Meet Vic, the Outdoor Adventurer

A substantial aspect of the Science for Wildlife program involves speaking at community events to raise awareness and to meet locals who will often come across native wildlife in their own backyards. These events help the local community to understand the work that S4W is completing, while also raising awareness of risks to native wildlife and how to mitigate these on a daily basis. Oftentimes, these events also result in new volunteers who have been inspired by hearing us speak about the organisation’s goals and projects. One such event is how we came to meet our ...

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Risks around administering food and water to native wildlife after a natural disaster

After experiencing a catastrophic natural disaster like the bushfire season of 2020, we naturally assume that putting out food and water sources for our native wildlife is a required action to assist in the environments healing. What many don’t realise, is that while appropriate in extreme circumstances, at other times these food and water sources can be harmful to our wildlife and are often not recommended. Well intentioned members of the public that try to assist wildlife in the longer term may in fact be jeopardising the health and wellbeing of our wildlife, and ...

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An Expert on the Blue Mountains Region – Meet Shane

As we launch into a new year of goals, projects and planning we are again reminded of just how important a role our Science for Wildlife volunteers play within our organisation. Many of our volunteers have grown up in the Blue Mountains area, spending their weekends exploring the national parks and walking trails, making their first-hand knowledge of the area invaluable during field surveys. Meet our volunteer Shane!

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2020… Where do we begin?

There is no denying that 2020 has been a year marked by significant challenges for individuals and communities across Australia. We began the year in a time of crisis, colloquially known as the ‘Black Summer’, with bush fires impacting an estimated 18.6 million hectares of land. After a period of much needed rain in February, the catastrophic bushfires that tore through 75% to 100% of our mapped koala habitats, finally came to a halt. Unfortunately, our nation’s relief was short lived as the global COVID19 pandemic reached our shores. The social, emotional and ...

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From Deer and Snow Leopards to Koalas – Meet Fanny

Our volunteers bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the Science for Wildlife team. For many, volunteering with our organisation is an extension of their chosen career path. The specialised skill sets and deep understanding of the field that these individuals bring has been invaluable to S4W research and field work projects. S4W volunteer Fanny Stricher is no exception, with a wealth of field experience in ecology and environmental conservation in both France and Australia. As a continuation of our volunteer article series and a gesture of thanks, this month we ...

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Koala Genomics to Help Conserve Koalas across the Species Range

Recently, our news has been overtaken by the impact of the 2019/20 bushfires and now we want to share what else we have been working on this year. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been involved in collaborative work on koala genomics, using a technique that looks at whole-genome DNA to get more information than ever before from the genetic code. With this information, we aim to inform species management. Particularly since the bushfires, which had a devastating impact on koalas and their habitats, there is a need to actively manage koala populations with the aim of ...

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Meet Our Volunteer: Kath

With summer on the horizon and a wealth of field studies currently under way across fire zones in the Blue Mountains, never has it been more important to have a strong team of citizen science volunteers by our side. These individuals have been imperative to our ability to study our remaining koala populations and provide these animals with the resources and protection they need to survive. In celebration of our wonderful team and continuing on from last month’s article featuring our husband and wife duo James and Carley, this month we recognised the contributions of ...

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Spring is here – listen to the dulcet tones of a koala bellow!

From September until March it is koala mating season. During this time, koalas are more conspicuous. Males are bellowing to attract mates and both males and females will travel kilometers to find their love interest for this season. All of this action makes it a great time to get an idea of where koalas are living. If you’re in an area where koalas might be around, keep an ear out for the amazing male bellow! You can listen to it here: The koala bellow is a bizarre sound, it is not what you’d expect from an apparently small, cute and fluffy mammal – but if ...

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Meet our Volunteers: Jim & Carley

Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects. Without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. Continuing on from last month’s article featuring our wonderful volunteer Julie, this month will be recognising the contributions of our husband and wife duo, Jim and Carley! Meet Jim and Carley Jim and Carley have been volunteers with Science for Wildlife for over two years. During this time they have trained in a number of fieldwork projects and played a critical ...

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