Extending The Impact Of Our Koala Post-Rehabilitation Project

We are pleased to announce the extension of our Post-Rehabilitation Project, which is providing important information on the success of koalas after rehabilitation and release from care. The project is supported by funding under the NSW Koala Strategy, with additional support from IFAW. The monitoring Project began in late 2019 after identifying a critical knowledge gap around koala rehabilitation and koala survival in the wild...

Read More


Help us Identify Australian Wildlife in Our New Camera Trap Project

Lyrebird
Are you a keen naturalist who can identify Australian animals and birds? Science for Wildlife would love your help on a new and exciting volunteer project! Our camera trap project will be kicking off in April 2021 and will allow us to be better informed when it comes to protecting and preserving Australian wildlife during future bushfire seasons. All you need to be able to help is access to a computer and the internet. About the S4W Camera Trap Project This time last year, the 2019/20 bushfires had been put out and the S4W team were winding up their emergency ...

Read More


Meet Kali the Koala!

Koala, Kali the Koala, Koala picture, Blue Mountains, Australian Wildlife
In celebration of International Women’s Day earlier this month, we’re shining a spotlight on one of our impressive, strong and resilient female koalas – Kali! The Science for Wildlife team started tracking Kali in 2017 and have gotten to know her quite well in that time. She was originally part of our pilot study at our second study site in Kanangra-Boyd National Park, and was one of the first koalas we discovered there. Kali is a homebody, and generally sticks to a very small area of trees. This has made it easy for the team to radio-track her when out ...

Read More


Encouraging Wildlife Conservation In Australian Schools through C.H.E.C.K

Schools, School presentation, Conservation, Education
We are proud to announce the launch of our new C.H.E.C.K. program in partnership with Sydney Zoo. C.H.E.C.K is an in-school project, utilising water towers to focus on Climate, Habitat, Environment and Conserving Koalas. More about C.H.E.C.K After the devastating bushfires of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team built and installed water towers in the Blue Mountains region, providing much needed water and food to native wildlife. As part of this program, Sydney Zoo funded and built an additional 80 water towers that were ready for deployment in early 2020. ...

Read More


Our Most Enthusiastic Team Member – Groot the Detection Dog!

Our youngest and most energetic team member Groot has been hard at work training to become a wildlife detection dog in the Science for Wildlife team. Groot will assist us in locating and tracking native wildlife by smelling and recognising their scat. Groot is our third generation of wildlife detection dogs within the S4W team, following on from the great work of our previous team member Badger, and our current detection dog Smudge. The use of detection dogs to identify scat is relatively new to Australia and is an incredibly effective method of tracking wildlife. A ...

Read More


Bushwalking, Canyoning and Exploring – Meet Vic, the Outdoor Adventurer

A substantial aspect of the Science for Wildlife program involves speaking at community events to raise awareness and to meet locals who will often come across native wildlife in their own backyards. These events help the local community to understand the work that S4W is completing, while also raising awareness of risks to native wildlife and how to mitigate these on a daily basis. Oftentimes, these events also result in new volunteers who have been inspired by hearing us speak about the organisation’s goals and projects. One such event is how we came to meet our ...

Read More


Risks around administering food and water to native wildlife after a natural disaster

After experiencing a catastrophic natural disaster like the bushfire season of 2020, we naturally assume that putting out food and water sources for our native wildlife is a required action to assist in the environments healing. What many don’t realise, is that while appropriate in extreme circumstances, at other times these food and water sources can be harmful to our wildlife and are often not recommended. Well intentioned members of the public that try to assist wildlife in the longer term may in fact be jeopardising the health and wellbeing of our wildlife, and ...

Read More


An Expert on the Blue Mountains Region – Meet Shane

As we launch into a new year of goals, projects and planning we are again reminded of just how important a role our Science for Wildlife volunteers play within our organisation. Many of our volunteers have grown up in the Blue Mountains area, spending their weekends exploring the national parks and walking trails, making their first-hand knowledge of the area invaluable during field surveys. Meet our volunteer Shane!

Read More


2020… Where do we begin?

There is no denying that 2020 has been a year marked by significant challenges for individuals and communities across Australia. We began the year in a time of crisis, colloquially known as the ‘Black Summer’, with bush fires impacting an estimated 18.6 million hectares of land. After a period of much needed rain in February, the catastrophic bushfires that tore through 75% to 100% of our mapped koala habitats, finally came to a halt. Unfortunately, our nation’s relief was short lived as the global COVID19 pandemic reached our shores. The social, emotional and ...

Read More


From Deer and Snow Leopards to Koalas – Meet Fanny

Our volunteers bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the Science for Wildlife team. For many, volunteering with our organisation is an extension of their chosen career path. The specialised skill sets and deep understanding of the field that these individuals bring has been invaluable to S4W research and field work projects. S4W volunteer Fanny Stricher is no exception, with a wealth of field experience in ecology and environmental conservation in both France and Australia. As a continuation of our volunteer article series and a gesture of thanks, this month we ...

Read More