14 results for tag: blue mountains koalas


Meet our Volunteers: Jim & Carley

Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects. Without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. Continuing on from last month’s article featuring our wonderful volunteer Julie, this month will be recognising the contributions of our husband and wife duo, Jim and Carley! Meet Jim and Carley Jim and Carley have been volunteers with Science for Wildlife for over two years. During this time they have trained in a number of fieldwork projects and played a critical role in the koala rescue efforts that occurred ahead of the catastrophic bushfire...

Meet Our Growing Team

Our work is scaling up - meet our growing team, and read about your chance to join in. We’ve dubbed the start of this year the apocalyptic summer. The four horsemen that rode on through were in the form of drought, fires, floods and then pestilence which arrived as Covid-19. It hasn’t been a favourite year for most people. However, out of the flames Science for Wildlife has emerged, a bit like Fawkes the phoenix out of Harry Potter, taking on new life to meet the post-apocalyptic challenges. We’re adapting and changing our wildlife research and conservation priorities in the burnt landscape of the Blue Mountains, to make sure we put ...

Meet Our Volunteer: Julie

Since our humble beginnings in 2014, Science for Wildlife has been actively studying Blue Mountains koalas and their habitats. This work tracking koala movements, discovering habitats, identifying suitable tree species for food and shelter, documenting mortality rates and the threats that koala populations face, would not be possible without the wonderful support of our volunteers. Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects and without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. They also play a major role in sharing our discoveries with local ...

Happy 1st Birthday to Groot!

Happy birthday to our youngest team member, Groot! Presently in training to be our next koala scat detection dog, this pup will be critical to future search and rescue efforts in bushfire and drought affected areas. As Groot has come to learn in his first year of life, there is much to learn about the koala scat dog profession. Lucky for him, his owner Dr Kellie Leigh is well equipped to teach him the tricks of the trade! Featured: Groot sitting in the bush (left), Groot showing off his weird sleeping habits (right) Wildlife detection dogs, like Groot and his older counterpart Smudge (who we introduced back in March, with his handler/owner Kim ...

How our research is changing the future of koala conservation

This year has shown beyond doubt that our wildlife is facing new challenges under climate change. We’ve been busy on the ground dealing with the impacts of the bushfires, but we’ve also been sharing our knowledge to help plan for the future. Our Executive Director, Dr Kellie Leigh, explains how we have been informing policy to improve the management and conservation of koalas. “I have been communicating our unique experience during the bushfires across a range of Government platforms that inform conservation management and policy. These platforms included two NSW Government Inquiry hearings, a special bushfire meeting under the NSW Koala ...

Where’s Wally?

We love to be able to share a good news story. A koala was reported late last week in Glenbrook in the Lower Blue Mountains. It’s not every day that a koala turns up there, and it’s probably even rarer that a koala named Wally turns up at all. How do we know his name you may ask? Wally was wearing some bling, an ear tag. So, when he was found, a photo and details of his ear tag were sent through to us to check if we knew him. We’ve never tagged any koalas in the Lower Blue Mountains, so it seemed unlikely that he would be part of any of our programs. However, upon checking, Kellie, Science for Wildlife’s ED, was delighted to discover that ...

Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Halfway through 2019 and things are steaming ahead..

News Highlights > We're delighted that our Blue Mountains Koala Project is one of 10 projects in NSW recently awarded funding under the NSW Koala Research Plan. > Our first round of koala scat surveys in and around Kanangra are done, adding more koala records to the map > There is a training day for koala radio-tracking coming up, on 14th July > Please Donate - help us keep up the momentum! End of financial year is here, all donations are tax deductible.

Koalas keep on coming, now in Winmalee

Press Release - Koalas are back in the Blue Mountains. Not long after the exciting report of a male koala at Govetts Leap in Blackheath, a run of koala sightings in Winmalee has caused quite a stir. It’s not all good news though, as many of these koalas are at risk.