6 results for tag: Blue Mountains


Meet Our Volunteer: Julie

Since our humble beginnings in 2014, Science for Wildlife has been actively studying Blue Mountains koalas and their habitats. This work tracking koala movements, discovering habitats, identifying suitable tree species for food and shelter, documenting mortality rates and the threats that koala populations face, would not be possible without the wonderful support of our volunteers. Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects and without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. They also play a major role in sharing our discoveries with local ...

Happy 1st Birthday to Groot!

Happy birthday to our youngest team member, Groot! Presently in training to be our next koala scat detection dog, this pup will be critical to future search and rescue efforts in bushfire and drought affected areas. As Groot has come to learn in his first year of life, there is much to learn about the koala scat dog profession. Lucky for him, his owner Dr Kellie Leigh is well equipped to teach him the tricks of the trade! Featured: Groot sitting in the bush (left), Groot showing off his weird sleeping habits (right) Wildlife detection dogs, like Groot and his older counterpart Smudge (who we introduced back in March, with his handler/owner Kim ...

Where’s Wally?

We love to be able to share a good news story. A koala was reported late last week in Glenbrook in the Lower Blue Mountains. It’s not every day that a koala turns up there, and it’s probably even rarer that a koala named Wally turns up at all. How do we know his name you may ask? Wally was wearing some bling, an ear tag. So, when he was found, a photo and details of his ear tag were sent through to us to check if we knew him. We’ve never tagged any koalas in the Lower Blue Mountains, so it seemed unlikely that he would be part of any of our programs. However, upon checking, Kellie, Science for Wildlife’s ED, was delighted to discover that ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Koalas Return to the Blue Mountains!

Science for Wildlife are pleased to announce that all of our koalas, saved from the recent bushfires, have been returned to their home in the Blue Mountains of Australia. We rescued these marsupials, who are representatives of the most genetically diverse population of koalas in Australia, from the devastating mega-fire that moved through the area in December 2019. They were sheltered in safety and cared for by the amazing staff at Taronga Zoo, with a team effort between Taronga and Science for Wildlife in keeping them fed. On Monday 23rd and Wednesday 25th March, they were reintroduced back into the eucalyptus forests by our team, with the support of ...