3 results for tag: Bushfire relief


Our Most Enthusiastic Team Member – Groot the Detection Dog!

Our youngest and most energetic team member Groot has been hard at work training to become a wildlife detection dog in the Science for Wildlife team. Groot will assist us in locating and tracking native wildlife by smelling and recognising their scat. Groot is our third generation of wildlife detection dogs within the S4W team, following on from the great work of our previous team member Badger, and our current detection dog Smudge. The use of detection dogs to identify scat is relatively new to Australia and is an incredibly effective method of tracking wildlife. A detection dog can cover in 5 minutes the same area that 3 people could cover in ...

Bushwalking, Canyoning and Exploring – Meet Vic, the Outdoor Adventurer

A substantial aspect of the Science for Wildlife program involves speaking at community events to raise awareness and to meet locals who will often come across native wildlife in their own backyards. These events help the local community to understand the work that S4W is completing, while also raising awareness of risks to native wildlife and how to mitigate these on a daily basis. Oftentimes, these events also result in new volunteers who have been inspired by hearing us speak about the organisation’s goals and projects. One such event is how we came to meet our wonderful volunteer, Vic Giniunas. Our Founding Director Dr Kellie was presen...

Risks around administering food and water to native wildlife after a natural disaster

After experiencing a catastrophic natural disaster like the bushfire season of 2020, we naturally assume that putting out food and water sources for our native wildlife is a required action to assist in the environments healing. What many don’t realise, is that while appropriate in extreme circumstances, at other times these food and water sources can be harmful to our wildlife and are often not recommended. Well intentioned members of the public that try to assist wildlife in the longer term may in fact be jeopardising the health and wellbeing of our wildlife, and therefore the recovery of populations and habitats after a natural disaster. In ...