6 results for tag: bushfire


Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Thank You to Our Donors – Large and Small

During the recent bushfire season Science for Wildlife was overwhelmed by the range of people who donated to help our cause, both locally and internationally. The incredible community support allowed us to scale up our efforts and ensure that the best available science and technology was being applied on the ground where it counted. Today we want to take the opportunity to thank those individuals, businesses and organisations for their support. Their generosity was imperative to our ability to act quickly and save precious wildlife from the unprecedented bushfires. Thank you to our donors Science for Wildlife received donations from a range of ...

Using Detection Dogs in the Search and Rescue of Koalas

As threatened species decline in number, they become more difficult to detect and assess, decreasing our ability to make informed conservation management decisions. To combat this threat, the Science for Wildlife team have been testing and putting into action innovative survey techniques, focussed on scats. Prior to the fires these surveys were used to find and map new populations of koalas, now they are being used to find animals that need care and also to identify habitats where wildlife might have survived the fires. Over the past two weeks the Science For Wildlife team have been running surveys for koalas in Kanangra-Boyd National Park. This ...

Using Satellite Imagery to effectively Deploy Critical Resources

In the wake of the bushfire disaster, there has been an urgent need to get water and food to native wildlife. However, it’s not easy to make sure supplies are going where they are most needed. By using the latest satellite imagery technology, the Science for Wildlife team are assessing where and when wildlife are in need of food and water supplies, so we can send our amazing team of volunteers into targeted areas. The impact of recent rainfall Recent rainfall, which extinguished some of the most persistent bush fires we have seen this season, came as a huge relief to many across the state. The Science for Wildlife Research and Volunteer teams were ...

Koalas Saved Ahead of Bushfire in the Blue Mountains

Devastating wildlife losses, caused by unprecedented bushfire conditions, have lead us to take some unprecedented actions. Over the weekend we moved out 12 koalas to keep them safe from fire. Through our research we have newly discovered these koala populations and how important they are for the conservation of the species. Our studies have shown the Blue Mountains World Heritage region supports koalas that have the highest level of genetic diversity recorded, and the population we have been working on Kanangra-Boyd National Park is one of only two populations in NSW that are free of chlamydial disease. We have watched as these mega-fires have burned ...