3 results for tag: koala rehabilitation


Risks around administering food and water to native wildlife after a natural disaster

After experiencing a catastrophic natural disaster like the bushfire season of 2020, we naturally assume that putting out food and water sources for our native wildlife is a required action to assist in the environments healing. What many don’t realise, is that while appropriate in extreme circumstances, at other times these food and water sources can be harmful to our wildlife and are often not recommended. Well intentioned members of the public that try to assist wildlife in the longer term may in fact be jeopardising the health and wellbeing of our wildlife, and therefore the recovery of populations and habitats after a natural disaster. In ...

Koala release in the Royal National Park

Science for Wildlife is thrilled to share news of the release of another koala into the iconic Royal National Park! The koala (named Royal), was originally taken into care after it had been found by WIRES in a Kirrawee front yard, near the very busy Forest Road and a local dog park. After being rehabilitated and fitted with a radio tracking device, this koala will now take part in our ongoing study monitoring rehabilitated koalas who have been released back into the wild. The Koala Post-Rehabilitation Project, being undertaken by Science for Wildlife in partnership with the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service and WIRES, looks at whether koalas ...

Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...