12 results for tag: koala research


Where’s Wally?

We love to be able to share a good news story. A koala was reported late last week in Glenbrook in the Lower Blue Mountains. It’s not every day that a koala turns up there, and it’s probably even rarer that a koala named Wally turns up at all. How do we know his name you may ask? Wally was wearing some bling, an ear tag. So, when he was found, a photo and details of his ear tag were sent through to us to check if we knew him. We’ve never tagged any koalas in the Lower Blue Mountains, so it seemed unlikely that he would be part of any of our programs. However, upon checking, Kellie, Science for Wildlife’s ED, was delighted to discover that ...

What’s next after the bushfires?

Thanks to some amazing support from our core Project partners San Diego Zoo, and funding for our research under the NSW Koala Strategy, we are now planning some large-scale surveys across the Greater Blue Mountains region to assess where koalas survived the fires. This is vital information for planning conservation action and population recovery. We need to know where the koalas are, so we can allocate resources to protect them. For example, if the surviving koalas are mostly in areas that have been developed by people, which were also asset protection zones and didn’t burn, then those koalas face human-caused threats including vehicle strike and ...

Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Thank You to Our Donors – Large and Small

During the recent bushfire season Science for Wildlife was overwhelmed by the range of people who donated to help our cause, both locally and internationally. The incredible community support allowed us to scale up our efforts and ensure that the best available science and technology was being applied on the ground where it counted. Today we want to take the opportunity to thank those individuals, businesses and organisations for their support. Their generosity was imperative to our ability to act quickly and save precious wildlife from the unprecedented bushfires. Thank you to our donors Science for Wildlife received donations from a range of ...

Halfway through 2019 and things are steaming ahead..

News Highlights > We're delighted that our Blue Mountains Koala Project is one of 10 projects in NSW recently awarded funding under the NSW Koala Research Plan. > Our first round of koala scat surveys in and around Kanangra are done, adding more koala records to the map > There is a training day for koala radio-tracking coming up, on 14th July > Please Donate - help us keep up the momentum! End of financial year is here, all donations are tax deductible.

Koalas keep on coming, now in Winmalee

Press Release - Koalas are back in the Blue Mountains. Not long after the exciting report of a male koala at Govetts Leap in Blackheath, a run of koala sightings in Winmalee has caused quite a stir. It’s not all good news though, as many of these koalas are at risk.

Koalas in our Midst – learn about koalas in the Hawkesbury region

You are warmly invited to attend a free information session on koalas in the Hawkesbury area. Hear from experts about where koalas occur in your area, what they sound like and how you can help them. You'll have an opportunity to participate in people-powered research too, as part of our Intrepid Koala Scat Survey in May this year.

You’re not going to believe this…

We have just discovered a colony of koalas in the World Heritage Blue Mountains region, living at over 1000m. Not only that, but they were found on the top of a ridge in what most experts would class as poor quality and highly unlikely habitat. This is exciting news for koalas!