10 results for tag: koala surveys


Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Using Detection Dogs in the Search and Rescue of Koalas

As threatened species decline in number, they become more difficult to detect and assess, decreasing our ability to make informed conservation management decisions. To combat this threat, the Science for Wildlife team have been testing and putting into action innovative survey techniques, focussed on scats. Prior to the fires these surveys were used to find and map new populations of koalas, now they are being used to find animals that need care and also to identify habitats where wildlife might have survived the fires. Over the past two weeks the Science For Wildlife team have been running surveys for koalas in Kanangra-Boyd National Park. This ...

Halfway through 2019 and things are steaming ahead..

News Highlights > We're delighted that our Blue Mountains Koala Project is one of 10 projects in NSW recently awarded funding under the NSW Koala Research Plan. > Our first round of koala scat surveys in and around Kanangra are done, adding more koala records to the map > There is a training day for koala radio-tracking coming up, on 14th July > Please Donate - help us keep up the momentum! End of financial year is here, all donations are tax deductible.

A first for koala welfare – a mini-tracker for koalas!

All of the koalas in the photos above are being radio-tracked, and not one of them is wearing a radio-collar. "How?" you may ask. We have developed a tiny and low impact radio-tracking device for koalas. For many decades, thousands of koalas across Australia have been fitted with radio-collars so that research teams can collect vital information on koala ecology and identify the threats they face. Collars are approved for use by Animal Ethics Committees across the country and until now there have been no alternatives, however, the collars can weigh 200gm or more and can occasionally cause "collar rub" where an irritation on the koala's neck is ...

What Scat is That? To find out, come and join the Intrepid Koala Scat Survey!

Feeling adventurous? Well, we have the perfect project for you! Finding koalas in the mountains just by looking up has proven to be difficult, so that's where scat surveys come in. Join our Intrepid Koala Scat Survey and help us to carry out surveys for koalas across a range of different habitats in the Blue Mountains region. Koalas are listed as a threatened species under the federal EPBC Act in NSW, QLD and the ACT and they are in decline across most of the species range. The Blue Mountains is a potentially important stronghold for them, but we know almost nothing about the koalas in this region. That's why we need your help. Mapping where koalas ...

Sad, sad news

Badger our beautiful scat detection dog, and stealer of hearts, has been diagnosed with cancer. Many of you have met him, either out on fieldwork or showing off to an audience at one of our community talks.

The story of George of the Jungle, a Troublesome Koala

Koalas are not as dull as they seem. When you see them dozing in a tree they look like they don’t get up to much, but some of them have a secret life full of adventures. George the koala, one of our study animals, is a perfect example. We captured him back in September last year in Wollemi National Park, at the start of koala breeding season and we fitted him with a new GPS collar. You can read about some of his adventures here...

Koalas, stubborn conservation dogs, and a shout out to our volunteers

It's been a busy few months of fieldwork, as we work to expand our Blue Mountains Koala Project into new areas and new habitats. First up, I'd like to say thanks to all the dedicated volunteers that came out koala spotting with us in Wollemi National Park recently...