16 results for tag: koala surveys


From Deer and Snow Leopards to Koalas – Meet Fanny

Our volunteers bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the Science for Wildlife team. For many, volunteering with our organisation is an extension of their chosen career path. The specialised skill sets and deep understanding of the field that these individuals bring has been invaluable to S4W research and field work projects. S4W volunteer Fanny Stricher is no exception, with a wealth of field experience in ecology and environmental conservation in both France and Australia. As a continuation of our volunteer article series and a gesture of thanks, this month we are recognising Fanny’s contributions to our organisation. Meet Fanny ...

Meet Our Volunteer: Kath

With summer on the horizon and a wealth of field studies currently under way across fire zones in the Blue Mountains, never has it been more important to have a strong team of citizen science volunteers by our side. These individuals have been imperative to our ability to study our remaining koala populations and provide these animals with the resources and protection they need to survive. In celebration of our wonderful team and continuing on from last month’s article featuring our husband and wife duo James and Carley, this month we recognised the contributions of our much-loved volunteer and videographer Kath Davis. Meet Kath Featured: ...

Spring is here – listen to the dulcet tones of a koala bellow!

From September until March it is koala mating season. During this time, koalas are more conspicuous. Males are bellowing to attract mates and both males and females will travel kilometers to find their love interest for this season. All of this action makes it a great time to get an idea of where koalas are living. If you’re in an area where koalas might be around, keep an ear out for the amazing male bellow! You can listen to it here: The koala bellow is a bizarre sound, it is not what you’d expect from an apparently small, cute and fluffy mammal – but if you know koalas like we do, it does give a hint that their outer cuddly-looking ...

Meet our Volunteers: Jim & Carley

Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects. Without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. Continuing on from last month’s article featuring our wonderful volunteer Julie, this month will be recognising the contributions of our husband and wife duo, Jim and Carley! Meet Jim and Carley Jim and Carley have been volunteers with Science for Wildlife for over two years. During this time they have trained in a number of fieldwork projects and played a critical role in the koala rescue efforts that occurred ahead of the catastrophic bushfire...

Meet Our Growing Team

Our work is scaling up - meet our growing team, and read about your chance to join in. We’ve dubbed the start of this year the apocalyptic summer. The four horsemen that rode on through were in the form of drought, fires, floods and then pestilence which arrived as Covid-19. It hasn’t been a favourite year for most people. However, out of the flames Science for Wildlife has emerged, a bit like Fawkes the phoenix out of Harry Potter, taking on new life to meet the post-apocalyptic challenges. We’re adapting and changing our wildlife research and conservation priorities in the burnt landscape of the Blue Mountains, to make sure we put ...

Meet Our Volunteer: Julie

Since our humble beginnings in 2014, Science for Wildlife has been actively studying Blue Mountains koalas and their habitats. This work tracking koala movements, discovering habitats, identifying suitable tree species for food and shelter, documenting mortality rates and the threats that koala populations face, would not be possible without the wonderful support of our volunteers. Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects and without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. They also play a major role in sharing our discoveries with local ...

Do koalas survive and thrive after care?

When koalas come into care, a great amount of resources, cost and time is required to rehabilitate them to the point of safe release back into the wild. Reasons for their admission are generally related to disease, dog attacks and car incidents, although fire events and subsequent translocations are increasingly impacting koala wellbeing. Unfortunately, a significant knowledge gap remains between koala rehabilitation and the resulting success or failure of koalas re-establishing in the wild. While many koalas have been rehabilitated and released, there are still very few post-release koala monitoring studies that have assessed whether or not the ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Using Detection Dogs in the Search and Rescue of Koalas

As threatened species decline in number, they become more difficult to detect and assess, decreasing our ability to make informed conservation management decisions. To combat this threat, the Science for Wildlife team have been testing and putting into action innovative survey techniques, focussed on scats. Prior to the fires these surveys were used to find and map new populations of koalas, now they are being used to find animals that need care and also to identify habitats where wildlife might have survived the fires. Over the past two weeks the Science For Wildlife team have been running surveys for koalas in Kanangra-Boyd National Park. This ...