6 results for tag: koala


Meet Kali the Koala!

In celebration of International Women’s Day earlier this month, we’re shining a spotlight on one of our impressive, strong and resilient female koalas – Kali! The Science for Wildlife team started tracking Kali in 2017 and have gotten to know her quite well in that time. She was originally part of our pilot study at our second study site in Kanangra-Boyd National Park, and was one of the first koalas we discovered there. Kali is a homebody, and generally sticks to a very small area of trees. This has made it easy for the team to radio-track her when out undertaking ecological studies, and has made her a popular koala to find when showca...

Thank You to Our Donors – Large and Small

During the recent bushfire season Science for Wildlife was overwhelmed by the range of people who donated to help our cause, both locally and internationally. The incredible community support allowed us to scale up our efforts and ensure that the best available science and technology was being applied on the ground where it counted. Today we want to take the opportunity to thank those individuals, businesses and organisations for their support. Their generosity was imperative to our ability to act quickly and save precious wildlife from the unprecedented bushfires. Thank you to our donors Science for Wildlife received donations from a range of ...

What Scat is That? To find out, come and join the Intrepid Koala Scat Survey!

Feeling adventurous? Well, we have the perfect project for you! Finding koalas in the mountains just by looking up has proven to be difficult, so that's where scat surveys come in. Join our Intrepid Koala Scat Survey and help us to carry out surveys for koalas across a range of different habitats in the Blue Mountains region. Koalas are listed as a threatened species under the federal EPBC Act in NSW, QLD and the ACT and they are in decline across most of the species range. The Blue Mountains is a potentially important stronghold for them, but we know almost nothing about the koalas in this region. That's why we need your help. Mapping where koalas ...

You’re not going to believe this…

We have just discovered a colony of koalas in the World Heritage Blue Mountains region, living at over 1000m. Not only that, but they were found on the top of a ridge in what most experts would class as poor quality and highly unlikely habitat. This is exciting news for koalas!

Groundbreaking new research into koala diversity

New research just out: Science for Wildlife is part of a project which uses new technology, whole-genome DNA to answer critical questions about koala conservation. To effectively manage koalas, we need to understand how different the populations across Australia are, and how genetically diverse they are or what their "fitness" level is. For example we know koalas in the south (Victoria) are bigger and have thicker fur than those in Queensland, because they are adapted to different climates. So we know not to translocate koalas from Queensland to Victoria, but we don’t know where the management boundaries lie in between. Our research aims to ...

The nose knows – the science is in on wildlife sniffer dogs

Scientists have for the first time tested wildlife detection dogs to see how they perform in different habitats, and the results are very impressive. Wildlife sniffer dogs are trained to find the scats (poo) or scent of hard to find wildlife species. As threatened species continue to drop in numbers, they become much harder to find and conserve. Detection dogs are a potential solution to that problem. Listen to ABC Radio National, or read all about it...