5 results for tag: NSW koala


Meet Our Volunteer: Julie

Since our humble beginnings in 2014, Science for Wildlife has been actively studying Blue Mountains koalas and their habitats. This work tracking koala movements, discovering habitats, identifying suitable tree species for food and shelter, documenting mortality rates and the threats that koala populations face, would not be possible without the wonderful support of our volunteers. Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects and without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. They also play a major role in sharing our discoveries with local ...

Where’s Wally?

We love to be able to share a good news story. A koala was reported late last week in Glenbrook in the Lower Blue Mountains. It’s not every day that a koala turns up there, and it’s probably even rarer that a koala named Wally turns up at all. How do we know his name you may ask? Wally was wearing some bling, an ear tag. So, when he was found, a photo and details of his ear tag were sent through to us to check if we knew him. We’ve never tagged any koalas in the Lower Blue Mountains, so it seemed unlikely that he would be part of any of our programs. However, upon checking, Kellie, Science for Wildlife’s ED, was delighted to discover that ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

The story of George of the Jungle, a Troublesome Koala

Koalas are not as dull as they seem. When you see them dozing in a tree they look like they don’t get up to much, but some of them have a secret life full of adventures. George the koala, one of our study animals, is a perfect example. We captured him back in September last year in Wollemi National Park, at the start of koala breeding season and we fitted him with a new GPS collar. You can read about some of his adventures here...

Koalas, stubborn conservation dogs, and a shout out to our volunteers

It's been a busy few months of fieldwork, as we work to expand our Blue Mountains Koala Project into new areas and new habitats. First up, I'd like to say thanks to all the dedicated volunteers that came out koala spotting with us in Wollemi National Park recently...