20 results for tag: science for wildlife


Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Thank You to Our Donors – Large and Small

During the recent bushfire season Science for Wildlife was overwhelmed by the range of people who donated to help our cause, both locally and internationally. The incredible community support allowed us to scale up our efforts and ensure that the best available science and technology was being applied on the ground where it counted. Today we want to take the opportunity to thank those individuals, businesses and organisations for their support. Their generosity was imperative to our ability to act quickly and save precious wildlife from the unprecedented bushfires. Thank you to our donors Science for Wildlife received donations from a range of ...

Koalas Return to the Blue Mountains!

Science for Wildlife are pleased to announce that all of our koalas, saved from the recent bushfires, have been returned to their home in the Blue Mountains of Australia. We rescued these marsupials, who are representatives of the most genetically diverse population of koalas in Australia, from the devastating mega-fire that moved through the area in December 2019. They were sheltered in safety and cared for by the amazing staff at Taronga Zoo, with a team effort between Taronga and Science for Wildlife in keeping them fed. On Monday 23rd and Wednesday 25th March, they were reintroduced back into the eucalyptus forests by our team, with the support of ...

The Importance of Volunteers to our Wildlife Conservation Mission

One of Science for Wildlife’s core values is Collaboration. We value the involvement of others as it ensures we deliver the highest quality conservation outcomes, enables us to connect communities to wildlife, helps build stewardship for conservation in the local community and also allows us to apply our research to on-ground conservation action. Without our volunteers, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible at all. Who are our volunteers and what role do they play? Our volunteers come from a variety of different community contexts including environmental and community groups, bushwalking ...

Using Satellite Imagery to effectively Deploy Critical Resources

In the wake of the bushfire disaster, there has been an urgent need to get water and food to native wildlife. However, it’s not easy to make sure supplies are going where they are most needed. By using the latest satellite imagery technology, the Science for Wildlife team are assessing where and when wildlife are in need of food and water supplies, so we can send our amazing team of volunteers into targeted areas. The impact of recent rainfall Recent rainfall, which extinguished some of the most persistent bush fires we have seen this season, came as a huge relief to many across the state. The Science for Wildlife Research and Volunteer teams were ...

Koalas Saved Ahead of Bushfire in the Blue Mountains

Devastating wildlife losses, caused by unprecedented bushfire conditions, have lead us to take some unprecedented actions. Over the weekend we moved out 12 koalas to keep them safe from fire. Through our research we have newly discovered these koala populations and how important they are for the conservation of the species. Our studies have shown the Blue Mountains World Heritage region supports koalas that have the highest level of genetic diversity recorded, and the population we have been working on Kanangra-Boyd National Park is one of only two populations in NSW that are free of chlamydial disease. We have watched as these mega-fires have ...

Halfway through 2019 and things are steaming ahead..

News Highlights > We're delighted that our Blue Mountains Koala Project is one of 10 projects in NSW recently awarded funding under the NSW Koala Research Plan. > Our first round of koala scat surveys in and around Kanangra are done, adding more koala records to the map > There is a training day for koala radio-tracking coming up, on 14th July > Please Donate - help us keep up the momentum! End of financial year is here, all donations are tax deductible.

Exciting news from Africa

It's been a long road full of challenges but a road well worth travelling; we are delighted to announce that we have just received endorsement from the Zambian Government for our collaborative wildlife conservation program. The aim of the program is to restore biodiversity and ecosystem processes in the stunning Lower Zambezi National Park in Zambia. In essence, it involves utilising large mammal species as flagships for conservation and includes working with eland, large carnivores, and elephants with a view to eventually reintroducing black rhino. We'll be undertaking ecological research to inform management, plus increasing protected area security ...

Koalas keep on coming, now in Winmalee

Press Release - Koalas are back in the Blue Mountains. Not long after the exciting report of a male koala at Govetts Leap in Blackheath, a run of koala sightings in Winmalee has caused quite a stir. It’s not all good news though, as many of these koalas are at risk.