7 results for tag: volunteers


Spring is here – listen to the dulcet tones of a koala bellow!

From September until March it is koala mating season. During this time, koalas are more conspicuous. Males are bellowing to attract mates and both males and females will travel kilometers to find their love interest for this season. All of this action makes it a great time to get an idea of where koalas are living. If you’re in an area where koalas might be around, keep an ear out for the amazing male bellow! You can listen to it here: The koala bellow is a bizarre sound, it is not what you’d expect from an apparently small, cute and fluffy mammal – but if you know koalas like we do, it does give a hint that their outer cuddly-looking ...

Meet our Volunteers: Jim & Carley

Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects. Without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. Continuing on from last month’s article featuring our wonderful volunteer Julie, this month will be recognising the contributions of our husband and wife duo, Jim and Carley! Meet Jim and Carley Jim and Carley have been volunteers with Science for Wildlife for over two years. During this time they have trained in a number of fieldwork projects and played a critical role in the koala rescue efforts that occurred ahead of the catastrophic bushfire...

Meet Our Volunteer: Julie

Since our humble beginnings in 2014, Science for Wildlife has been actively studying Blue Mountains koalas and their habitats. This work tracking koala movements, discovering habitats, identifying suitable tree species for food and shelter, documenting mortality rates and the threats that koala populations face, would not be possible without the wonderful support of our volunteers. Our volunteers are paramount to the implementation of Science for Wildlife projects and without them, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible. They also play a major role in sharing our discoveries with local ...

Celebrating National Volunteer Week: Koala Tracking with S4W Volunteers

Even before the devastating bushfires of last summer, koalas were listed as a threatened species, vulnerable to extinction across most of their range in Australia. The drop in the number of koalas has been from 3-4 million historically to less than 400,000 today. This decline was a direct result of the koala fur trade until the early 1900s, followed more recently by habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, human threats in developed areas and from climate change associated phenomenon, including record-breaking drought, heat and bushfires on a scale and severity that we’ve never seen before. Since 2014, Science for Wildlife has been uncovering the ...

Is the Planet Trying to Tell Us Something?

With the impacts of the recent bushfires and currently COVID-19 being felt around the country we must ask, is the planet trying to tell us something? These events have placed immense pressure on our environment, our economy, and our mental health. Sadly, the impacts of these unprecedented times have also been felt by our wildlife, in particular our koalas. Stories of hope Over recent years, in the lead up to the catastrophic bushfire season of 2019/2020, the Science for Wildlife team were sharing stories of hope and good news from our koala project. Some of these stories included: Uncovering a large population of koalas in the Blue Mountains, a ...

Koalas Return to the Blue Mountains!

Science for Wildlife are pleased to announce that all of our koalas, saved from the recent bushfires, have been returned to their home in the Blue Mountains of Australia. We rescued these marsupials, who are representatives of the most genetically diverse population of koalas in Australia, from the devastating mega-fire that moved through the area in December 2019. They were sheltered in safety and cared for by the amazing staff at Taronga Zoo, with a team effort between Taronga and Science for Wildlife in keeping them fed. On Monday 23rd and Wednesday 25th March, they were reintroduced back into the eucalyptus forests by our team, with the support of ...

The Importance of Volunteers to our Wildlife Conservation Mission

One of Science for Wildlife’s core values is Collaboration. We value the involvement of others as it ensures we deliver the highest quality conservation outcomes, enables us to connect communities to wildlife, helps build stewardship for conservation in the local community and also allows us to apply our research to on-ground conservation action. Without our volunteers, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible at all. Who are our volunteers and what role do they play? Our volunteers come from a variety of different community contexts including environmental and community groups, bushwalking ...