8 results for tag: wildlife conservation


Project Plant It – Providing a Future For Our Local Koalas

Last week, on Wednesday the 26th of May, 80 trees were planted by students from Winmalee Primary School with the guidance and help from the Blue Mountains Youth Councillors as a part of Project Plant It. The students and councillors planted a range of Australian native trees at Springwood's Deanei Forest on Wednesday. These tree species included: Eucalyptus deanei, Eucalyptus punctata, Syncarpia glomulifera, as well as 3 types of wattle; Acacia longifolia, Acacia ulicifolia and Acacia parramattensis. The trees were chosen to help maintain the forest as well as provide food and shelter for koalas.Science for Wildlife was honoured to be ...

Extending The Impact Of Our Koala Post-Rehabilitation Project

We are pleased to announce the extension of our Post-Rehabilitation Project, which is providing important information on the success of koalas after rehabilitation and release from care. The project is supported by funding under the NSW Koala Strategy, with additional support from IFAW. The monitoring Project began in late 2019 after identifying a critical knowledge gap around koala rehabilitation and koala survival in the wild...

Meet Kali the Koala!

In celebration of International Women’s Day earlier this month, we’re shining a spotlight on one of our impressive, strong and resilient female koalas – Kali! The Science for Wildlife team started tracking Kali in 2017 and have gotten to know her quite well in that time. She was originally part of our pilot study at our second study site in Kanangra-Boyd National Park, and was one of the first koalas we discovered there. Kali is a homebody, and generally sticks to a very small area of trees. This has made it easy for the team to radio-track her when out undertaking ecological studies, and has made her a popular koala to find when showca...

Our Most Enthusiastic Team Member – Groot the Detection Dog!

Our youngest and most energetic team member Groot has been hard at work training to become a wildlife detection dog in the Science for Wildlife team. Groot will assist us in locating and tracking native wildlife by smelling and recognising their scat. Groot is our third generation of wildlife detection dogs within the S4W team, following on from the great work of our previous team member Badger, and our current detection dog Smudge. The use of detection dogs to identify scat is relatively new to Australia and is an incredibly effective method of tracking wildlife. A detection dog can cover in 5 minutes the same area that 3 people could cover in ...

An Expert on the Blue Mountains Region – Meet Shane

As we launch into a new year of goals, projects and planning we are again reminded of just how important a role our Science for Wildlife volunteers play within our organisation. Many of our volunteers have grown up in the Blue Mountains area, spending their weekends exploring the national parks and walking trails, making their first-hand knowledge of the area invaluable during field surveys. Meet our volunteer Shane!

2020… Where do we begin?

There is no denying that 2020 has been a year marked by significant challenges for individuals and communities across Australia. We began the year in a time of crisis, colloquially known as the ‘Black Summer’, with bush fires impacting an estimated 18.6 million hectares of land. After a period of much needed rain in February, the catastrophic bushfires that tore through 75% to 100% of our mapped koala habitats, finally came to a halt. Unfortunately, our nation’s relief was short lived as the global COVID19 pandemic reached our shores. The social, emotional and economic impacts of COVID-19 were felt by everyone in our community. This, combined ...

Meet Our Growing Team

Our work is scaling up - meet our growing team, and read about your chance to join in. We’ve dubbed the start of this year the apocalyptic summer. The four horsemen that rode on through were in the form of drought, fires, floods and then pestilence which arrived as Covid-19. It hasn’t been a favourite year for most people. However, out of the flames Science for Wildlife has emerged, a bit like Fawkes the phoenix out of Harry Potter, taking on new life to meet the post-apocalyptic challenges. We’re adapting and changing our wildlife research and conservation priorities in the burnt landscape of the Blue Mountains, to make sure we put ...

The Importance of Volunteers to our Wildlife Conservation Mission

One of Science for Wildlife’s core values is Collaboration. We value the involvement of others as it ensures we deliver the highest quality conservation outcomes, enables us to connect communities to wildlife, helps build stewardship for conservation in the local community and also allows us to apply our research to on-ground conservation action. Without our volunteers, many of our projects and initiatives would not be as effective and in some instances, not possible at all. Who are our volunteers and what role do they play? Our volunteers come from a variety of different community contexts including environmental and community groups, bushwalking ...